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Sunday, December 6, 2020

Irish Survives The Great Blizzard 12-5-2020 A.D

 

 Three days lead up of "omg !!!leventy storm"  to this:



"Back in my day" voice....





 

 

 

22 comments:

  1. In my area of NH we barely got a dusting. Not even glaze ice from all the rain before the cold front blew in.

    Not complaining. Not a Skier.

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  2. Here at the top of the hill in Candia we got 8"+, some trees down and no power.

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  3. Yep. Uphill both ways ;^)).

    We got about the same amount where I live. One very minor power blip that I probably wouldn't have noticed except the computer's UPS squawked once. So, our magnificent (I use that word loosely here) weather forecasters were wrong once again. The only job in the world where you can be wrong 99% of the time and remain employed.

    Nemo

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    Replies
    1. Dr. Fauci is doing about the same % of accuracy in his line of work, as well.

      TN Patriot

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  4. Yup.
    The Dakotas.
    Up hill & against the wind both ways to school.

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  5. my dad used to live at a camp in ossipee,NH that was halfway up a hill. there was a road that snaked it's way along the valley then up the ridge.

    the bus used to pick him up at the top...and drop him off at the bottom.so uphill, both ways.

    we always thought he was lying until my grandmother confirmed it. it gave him more time to be ready in the morning, and less time on the bus in the afternoon.

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  6. We didn’t have backpacks
    Paul J

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    Replies
    1. Yeah remember the old belt that you looped around your books to lug them home? Back when there was such a thing as homework.

      Delete
  7. Yep, Southwestern Michigan, number two lake effect capital of the country, second only to Buffalo, NY, that had two lakes nearby to deal with.

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  8. Everyone stocked up well before December 21 I hope 😊
    The last time this happened was 800 years ago. Should be interesting...

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  9. Shit, if we got as much as was in picture one down here in the Florida panhandle, EVERYTHING would shut down and people would run around in circles screaming and pissing themselves.
    Then again, we just had a hurricane not long ago that damn near dumped 30 inches of rain on our ass with 115 MPH winds.

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  10. Our school principal lived across the street from the high school. Our theory was that if he could walk across the street without falling, we had school. On snowy days we'd listen to the radio for school closings. They would name every school within a 50 mile radius except ours.

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  11. When I was a kid we walked about 1/4 mile to the bus stop and school was never cancelled, buses used to chain up. Today the bus stops every house to get a kid and if there is any chance of snow they cancel school

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    Replies
    1. Well, mine was 1/2 mile, but same same. For Junior High (Middle School) or Elementary, I was within 1/2 mile so I always walked. Always - even in blizzards, which almost never cancelled school.
      The only one I can remember is when it got to -25F and the school buses wouldn't start... yet my brother, sister and I had to deliver papers.

      Delete
  12. We lived close to the bottom of a hill, along a river in NH. The town’s private Catholic school was on the other side of the hill at the bottom.

    Up and down going and back. We could have gone around the base on Main St, but that would have added a lot of distance.

    The public school was at the top of the hill, and we marched past it in the snow. Public kids also had busses.

    ReplyDelete
  13. We lived close to the bottom of a hill, along a river in NH. The town’s private Catholic school was on the other side of the hill at the bottom.

    Up and down going and back. We could have gone around the base on Main St, but that would have added a lot of distance.

    The public school was at the top of the hill, and we marched past it in the snow. Public kids also had busses.

    ReplyDelete
  14. We lived close to the bottom of a hill, along a river in NH. The town’s private Catholic school was on the other side of the hill at the bottom.

    Up and down going and back. We could have gone around the base on Main St, but that would have added a lot of distance.

    The public school was at the top of the hill, and we marched past it in the snow. Public kids also had busses.

    ReplyDelete
  15. When I was a little school kid, nearly every storm dropped knee deep snow. A really bad storm was waist deep. We managed to walk to school anyway. Many years later I realized my knees were a lot closer to the ground in those days.

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  16. We were the kids who lived out in the sticks away from town. School would not come into our little subdivision because our private roads were so bad. Literally a mile and a half walk to the bus stop, up hill. And if you were late, you ran! Great childhood, we were the ones with dirt bikes, bb guns, tree forts, secret camp sites and pond fishing.

    MF

    ReplyDelete

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