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Monday, November 27, 2023

Damn, the dust in here must be covered with fresh cut onions...

 

 Borrowed with all due respect to blog brother Kenny   









31 comments:

  1. This video exaggerates the effect such stimulus can have on someone with Alzheimer's/dementia but such experiences can have a salutary effect. Alzheimer's/senile dementia is probably the cruelest fate possible. Losing everything that makes a person who they are.

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    1. It is touching and heartwarming. Good for the soul. Why can't we just enjoy things for how they are presented instead of nit-picking at every detail. Your life must be an absolute misery.

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    2. Hey, anon. Lay off. You don't know where Dan is coming from. Beside, he can speak his mind as much as any of us, including you.

      If you've care for, or have watched a loved one slip away, you may change your tone.

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    3. Let god sort em out

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    4. Thanks, Irish. The truth behind the video is not: "Take your loved ones suffering with dementia to places that have memories and play well-known songs and they will respond." The truth is: Do all that, tell stories, hug them, love them, interact with them - and it might get through. If it doesn't appear to get through, trust that as you love the one who is hard to love and serve the one who is hard to serve, the God who loved you when you were hard to love is glorified.

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    5. Thank You For This! Good For The Soul!

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    6. Thank You For This, good for the soul

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  2. Nice add. I've read stories of those so afflicted having moments of clear thought that are very comforting for those around at the moment. My father in law had times shortly before his death with dementia when he appeared to know his family - the healthy bloke was still in there somewhere. Being a sceptic I wasn't completely convinced but my wife, who (for good reason) wasn't close to him until he became unwell and softened, took great comfort from the gems that were offered up and much healing of a relationship took place.

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  3. Why is my monitor so fuzzy and hard to read? As a senior with a sister in the last stages of Alzheimer's, that made me cry hard. Thanks. I needed that.

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  4. Damn, Irish. You know how to spread that dust/onion vapor all the way down to TN. MIL had dementia and it was so sad that there were very few "good" moments and lots of lost ones.

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  5. I try to be a little more cynical where GM is concerned but yeah, a little dusty.

    Back in the dark ages, when Chevy's were fabricated from wrought iron and ran on steam power, once in a while you could prank a parts guy into trying to find a driver's side rear door for Suburban's of that era.

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  6. That was tough to watch. Lots of depth there.

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  7. The fresh cut onion fairy has been in my house too.

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  8. "It never seems to snow as much as it used to."

    They always slip it in there, don't they?

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  9. I follow your site pretty religiously and really enjoy it. I have never commented before - and I refuse to have a google account so I guess I'll be another "anonymous". Just wanted to say that this hits a little too close to problems at home right now - my wife is slowly recovering from a stroke and has moments where she is "lost" and in all honesty I don't know whether to thank you for the inspiration in this film or be upset for making me fear where her issues might lead.

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    1. I'm praying for you brother. Life has no guarantees. Mine has flipped upside down and slowly sunk while burning. But there have been some good things in it, too. Keep swinging for the homer. Get some help and rest when you need to. Take it in bite size pieces.

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    2. You can just enter your name or pseudonym if you hit the down arrow and put your name in the "name/url" box. You don't need a URL.
      Cheers

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  10. Sadly, I've discovered that growing old is all about learning to let go ....
    Letting go of the things we used to be able to do, letting go of the things and the people we knew , and eventually letting go of life itself. Seems the only thing we keep are the memories and the love.

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  11. Dementia/Alzheimers is one sonofabitch having witnessed the decline of a once vibrant woman in my mother over a 10-15 year period, especially the last five years, it was a blessing when she passed.

    Remember the good times/days and above all, be patient with anyone afflicted.

    Nemo

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  12. As someone that has deployed to many conflicts, my worst fear is loosing my memory's, even the bad ones that keep me up at night, they have made me who I am. Alzheimer's/dementia is very cruel, and we all should take a moment to remember that that are affected and do things like the girl in this video did.

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  13. I have seen this effect up close. On an EMT run a few years ago, we responded for an elderly Alzheimers patient who drank the blue toilet water stabilizer that his daughter had purchased to winterize her motorhome. He mistook the bottle for his Ensure. When we arrived, the blue fluid was still dribbling down his chin and he was completely incoherent he wasn't poisoned as he'd spit the stuff out rather than swallowing it. As I always do, I got down on one knee and introduced myself and asked, "what can I call you?". In one brief, shining moment he said, "I don't care what you call me, just don't call me late for dinner"! After that he lapsed back into an incoherent mumble all the way to the hospital.

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  14. Yeah that one got to me Irish. We are going through it with my Pops right now plus when my daughter was a baby I used to sing that song to her and she would smile and laugh. Thanks Brother.

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  15. No merry Christmas at the end just a happy holidays

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  16. Damn my crying eyes.

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  17. Wonderful, wonderful.

    Alzheimer's is truly something that is hard to deal with. Now that I've had my share of it to deal with, and now that I'm 70+ and in the danger zone, my fervent hope is to NOT have to deal with any more. Please, God, let me die a "natural" death instead of the living hell my children would be put through if I or my Eternal Companion get it. That's my only fear in life.

    Enough. Let us all press on and make the most of what is thrown at us, and pray to God that He will give us the strength to endure until it's our turn!

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  18. I had to mostly disable my firewall to reply.
    I have been through this twice now. Once with my father's mother, and then later with my mother's mother. Dad's mother took nearly twenty years to succumb. Mom's mother didn't take as long, but only because she broke her hip, which sped things up. Alzheimer's is merciless and will open your soul. I know this because every time mom's mom woke up, she inquired as to her husband of 65 years, who had already died. Now, imagine being told your spouse was dead 5 times a day. Now imagine having to tell your mother's mother that your mother's father was dead, 5 times a day, and having to watch her experience that loss 5 times every day, day in and day out. Then, after four years of this, instead of grieving, she'd exclaim "About time! I never liked that bastard!" every time she'd inquire about him...5 times a day.

    I'll admit that I can be an evil fucking bastard, but even I wouldn't wish this on my worst enemy.

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  19. Dang you! My coffee’s all salty now! The video reminds me that whatever my condition is or will become, there’s a lot for me to remember and cherish. This year I had to have three heart procedures, but I got to walk my granddaughter down the aisle in November. Thank You, God for that gift.

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  20. Yeah, D/al's is a remorseful torturer of the inner circle. It got my wife's Gma and is working on her Dad. We are in for a long and hard road. Is it cruel to ask for a quick and merciful death? I don't know other than my vow of good times and bad.

    On another note, would this even play today? White nuclear family, at least three generations, no POC's or LGBTQRS just a message of remembrance, dignity and caring. This was America. This was the America I remember. This was the America that endured as a permanent Rockwell painting of our collective experience. Nuclear families do this, Black, White, Hispanic, Jew, Muslim or Gentile celebrate the family, our inner circle tribe.

    Now, how do we get it back? How do we care for our inner circle tribe so that we can care for each other? TPTB have effectively Balkanized race against race, religion against religion, party against party, country against country. Can we collectively elect not to play? Do we still have this choice? There is a day soon coming where each man to his house is going to have to choose. Choose wisely.

    Spin Drift

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  21. I wonder why I always start the tears from the right eye first? Left eye must be made from sterner stuff.

    My mother had bouts of dementia, however there was that one time in the hospital when the nurse came in and started with those 'questions'.
    Nurse: "Do you know what day it is?"
    Mom: "Not really"
    Nurse: "Do you know what month it is?"
    Mom: "June?"
    Nurse: "No, its October", "Do you know who the President of the United States is?"
    Mom: "No"
    Nurse: "That's OK dear, it's Barack Obama"
    Mom: "Oh No! Not that asshole!"

    Yeah Mom.

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