Header image link

Link >>>>>> HEADER

Saturday, February 13, 2021

Irish, Voodoo, Angels, Aging....

  

  I woke up a couple mornings ago and my shoulder was killing me. Overall I'm active as far as things that need to be done at work like moving materials, bins , raw stock or stuff around the home. Cleaning the paddock, snow blowing, shoveling, clearing old dead trees in the back 2 acres. You get the drift. Even though I don't have a formal exercise routine and I'm not in my "prime" and I'm carrying more than a few extra pounds, I do get random amounts of physical labor almost daily. 


 Back to the other day, I guess my guardian angel



Was asleep when someone decided to let someone stuff a lawn dart into my voodoo doll.



Man, this fucking hurts.  

Never once, during the recent past, did I do anything that felt like a pulled muscle or tear so wtf?

The front and outside of my right shoulder is sore to the touch and range of motion is limited as the pain increases.

Most of my symptoms point to rotator cuff tendonitis:

 

 The most common cause of shoulder pain is rotator cuff tendinitis — inflammation of key tendons in the shoulder. The earliest symptom is a dull ache around the outside tip of the shoulder that gets worse when you push, pull, reach overhead, or lift your arm up to the side. Lying on the affected shoulder also hurts, and the pain may wake you at night, especially if you roll onto that shoulder. Even getting dressed can be a trial. Eventually, the pain may become more severe and extend over the entire shoulder.


I'm resting it for the weekend and will decide whether or not to call my PC to get a better diagnosis.

Most of the info on line calls for hot/cold therapy and anti inflammatory OTC medication. 

Then you can find exercises to re strengthen the muscle and regain range of motion.

Going the route of orthopedic help and physical therapy could be an option as well.

Has anyone dealt with this?  What worked?

 

 





70 comments:

  1. I hurt my left shoulder/rotator once when i tried to catch myself after slipping off a ladder on a 4 axle trailer when I hauled rock years ago. Pain was intense and wouldnt go away. OTC drugs dulled the pain but never got rid of it. Cortisone shot right into the heart of the joint or rotator was the only thing that worked. Its been 20+ years so maybe they may have a better solution now. Good luck, i hope you get it figured out quickly. Also, I really enjoy your site.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Hoss, glad you enjoy the site!

      Delete
    2. I basically had the same problem in my late 30's. It was the result of a new mattress and the way I was sleeping on my arm. I couldn't raise my right arm above the height of my shoulder and agonizing pain. A business client recommended trying a Cortisone shot. The doctor said Cortisone shots were hit and miss. He also said the injection would hurt and if it was to be successful, I should feel relief immediately. He brought out a syringe that looked like something you'd use on a large farm animal. The shot didn't hurt too bad and there wasn't any immediate positive results. The next morning I didn't have any pain and I could raise/extend my arm fully. I got rid of the mattress. That was twenty years ago and I haven't had any more problems. Good luck my friend.

      Delete
  2. Unfortunately, ice is your friend as its acute....35 minutes on, off for an hour, repeat. This should break the pain, spasm, pain cycle. No heat. If you can stand it, pin a tennis ball behind the shoulder and let your legs push and roll back and forth on it. Continue this for a couple days and drugs may help too.
    R

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm gonna be good to it over the weekend then plan what to do on Monday Thanks.

      Delete
  3. If your stuff is damaged no PT will work. Ive had both my shoulders repaired. One with a torn labrum and the other a rotator cuff. Lifetime of physical labor will do that to ya. Cortisone works for awhile. Both shoulders are good for the last 7 years after about 3-4 months of rehab.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm hoping it's just overuse and not a tear or damage. Time will tell. Thanks SJM

      Delete
  4. I have the same issue. Last July, I pulled some stuff around on the concrete ramp at work. It was heavy, but it was on some steel rollers, once you got it moving, no problem. My right shoulder started up with the pain you describe a day or so later. It comes and goes. Seems like I keep making it mad.

    It eased off a lot last fall, then it would come back. Sleeping on it can be a bear when it's acting up. I haven't found anything to help long haul yet. We are too young to be this old.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are too young to be this old. No Shit. 9:00pm is the new 1:00am on Weekend nights. usually :)

      Delete
  5. Irish ... not quite two years ago, I "tweaked" my right shoulder moving some boxes of copier paper. Lemme tell ya .. "tweaked" is a highly charitable description. I definitely involved tendons/ligaments in my right shoulder. Prescription NSIAD meds did NOTHING for the pain nor the inflammation. As time marched on, the shoulder stiffened up to where I could barely raise my right arm up to about 45 degrees away from my side, or 45 degrees below horizontal ... off to ortho ... cortisone shot in the afflicted area. Lemme tell ya, in my case, in my particular circumstance, cortisone was the MIRACLE DRUG. Within 15 mins of the injection, things were definitely loosening up. Within an hour, I just about had full range of motion coupled with much reduced pain. This was May or June of 2019 ... haven't had a problem since. This is my tale, your mileage may vary.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Brad. Maybe I get a cortizone shot on Monday.

      Delete
  6. A steroid shot to area, cortisone i think pain goes fast

    ReplyDelete
  7. Fell of my truck in 2010 and landed on my right shoulder. Told myself on the way down "This is going to hurt". That night trying to get into bed was excruciating so my wife bagged me up and took me to the emergency room. After X-rays and MRIs had rotator cuff surgery, 4 weeks of no movement then 6 weeks of physical therapy. Worked for me. Don't recommend overexerting yourself after the age of 60. I'm 73 now and my left shoulder has a twinge.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That must have sucked Lin. I'll see about things on Monday. Thanks!

      Delete
  8. I would encourage you right off the bat to going to an orthopedist toot suite, Rotator cuff injuries and SLAPS (Superior Labral to Posterior Tear) are not to be trifled with, continued pain and soreness with limited range of motion which will eventually if not treated and PT intervention will render your shoulder frozen as to use and motion. Continue to use the hot/cold therapy and OTC anti inflammatory medication, but be careful of the exercise regimen until you have a Pain & Torture therapist evaluation. Why the shoulder hurts more when prone is your shoulder drops and puts pressure on the labrum and tendons in your shoulder. I have had both L rotator cuff surgery and a R SLAP surgery to repair and tendon and cartilage damage. I worked on the ward and shrugged through until the pain and muscle limitations caused me to seek a shoulder orthopedist. I am glad I did even though I delayed seeing someone, nurses and doctors are the worst patients. The result of my delaying was a long and arduous PT and the pain and torture staff was gleeful and malicious in their treatment. Irish, I would say I gained about 95% usage out of both shoulders after 35 years. I still get tenderness and stiffness in my shoulders and I do my wall climb and extension and adduction exercises and that helps tremendously. It isn't fun and it is life changing to a degree. I hope you get it done what with the cultural and government milieu I wouldn't wait.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. what Cederq says: get thee to the medic. I had a 1" tear in the rotator cuff and a bicep tendon that was almost completely torn in two. January 2020 surgery. 6 weeks in an arm sling and no weights, 6 weeks of elastic band stretches and just stretching; then onto very light weights. Humbling experience. Now one year later, I am on my way back to being active again.

      Delete
    2. Thanks Mom!! HA. I'll call the Dr's on Monday.

      Delete
    3. I agree with Cederq - time for a medic. I am 66 and recovering from my third shoulder surgery since my 40s. If it doesn't resolve in a few weeks, you need good medical help. An MRI should show what's going on well enough to determine if cortisone and PT will help or if you need to go to the body shop.

      Delete
  9. Heh, My story is weak compared to all the other guys.....I slept wrong.....yeap,woke up one day and couldn't lift my arm up to get the coffee cup off the shelf. Being German (read stubborn in that), I refused to go to the MD (I work in the medical industry and know how they drag things out). So I used Ibuprofen and my chiropractor.
    After about 4 weeks I can't remember when it got better. But it did.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Why is it all German's are stubborn? I live with one so first hand knowledge. As noted in my replies above I'll get a course of action this week. What did our ancestors do? If they were laid up and couldn't get food they died. I don't think I'm at that step of the game, yet.
      Thanks Steve

      Delete
    2. "Stubborn" is a dominant gene in Germans. My wife is the daughter of 1st generation American born Germans on both sides of her family. Stubborn?!? You betcha. My only response to many things is ,"Yes, Dear". Happy wife, Happy life.

      Delete
    3. Irish, Swedes are pretty stubborn too... hell, we all are a ancient Northern Germanic tribes...

      Delete
    4. yep, us Swedes can be a touch hard headed. and, by the way, I am 73 and had that surgery last year at 72. doc said if I had a '47 model car, wouldn't there be a part or two that was wearing out?
      Sigh.

      Delete
    5. Actually, I'm half German and half Norwegian.....my wife says I'm dumb AND stubborn.....any idea what she means by that?

      Delete
    6. Yes Steve, there is, but do you have a week to discuss it under intense therapy?

      Delete
  10. I'm seeing lots of solid advice....cortisone will help..........the pool at the Y has been great for low inpact movement ,stretching/etc........old age isn't for sissys....good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Although very rare, GOUT does occur in the shoulder. If you didn't have "trauma" to it, and the pain is as sudden, inexplicable, and intense as you suggest...gout. If that's it, the docs will prescribe painkillers. Which will treat the symptoms. If it IS gout, you could treat the actual cause (an abundance of acid in your system) with baking soda. Half a tsp in ~8oz warm h2o, twice a day, on an empty stomach.

    Long-time reader, 1st time commenter
    OverMountainMan on Gab

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I too do the baking soda regimen and at night I take one tablespoon of raw apple cider vinegar with the "mother" and a package of powdered vit C in 8 ozs of dihydrogen/monoxide...

      Delete
    2. Gout is from of an overabundance of URIC acid in the system … tiny crystals that, under a microscope, look like tiny needles with a sharp tip at each end (I know because my MD showed me from the blood sample).

      Typically, colchicine (.06mg -- 2 immediately and 1 an hour later) is the 'treatment' -- but be aware that colchicine is not quite as benign as we'd like to think.

      Also, since I am HYPOthyroid (UNDERactive thyroid -- lots of radiation damage to my thyroid), my MD said I'd be prone to gout … 

      Delete
  12. Ice, Motrin, bourbon and rest.
    I hope it's not a tear.

    Gerry

    ReplyDelete
  13. Irish, I have the same problem . These exersizes helped cure mine . Good luck. Hopefully you didn't tear a tendon. https://tinyurl.com/hyvi3osg

    ReplyDelete
  14. I've had tendonitis in both shoulders over time. The usual "go to" was oral prednisone. I have had a cortisone once a bit over 20 years ago when the oral path was not effective. If ibuprofen (600 mg 4 times daily) does not work within a week, then prednisone. If the prednisone series didn't work, then cortisone injection. If that does not knock it out, then something has problem been damaged sufficiently that the body can't recover on its own, even with pharmaceutical aid, and that would probably mean surgery.

    Docs aren't as knife happy as they used to be and normally want to use the least invasive methods first.

    By the by, my right shoulder has given me no trouble since the cortisone injection back in '96.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Acupuncture can provide pain relief and manage the inflammation.

    I've been using acupuncture for a number of conditions during the past 20 years … I've found it to be genuinely beneficial -- sometimes providing help and/or relief when Western medicine cannot do so.

    ReplyDelete
  16. So now you know. The internet was wrong. You don’t grow hair on your palm or go blind. My God man give it a break. And using the other hand is a bad idea.

    ReplyDelete
  17. FWIW I haven't faced your problem directly, but have had other issues with sprains, bursitis, rotator cuff, etc. My primary care Doc was trained in sports medicine, but went into family practice. He's always come through with stretching and strengthening exercises and physical therapy for me to do at home. Rest, ice/heat, ibuprofen starts things off and his regime cleans thing up, every time so far. Maybe find someone with similar expertise?
    -tallow pot

    ReplyDelete
  18. Looks like yer old boys and girls have got this covered. And I need to do something as well. Thank you all for the advice. Both shoulders, and the entire cervical spine are FUBAR'd. Sleep? maybe.
    And yes, Germans are stubborn.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Run some dirt on it and get back in the game.

    Josey W

    ReplyDelete
  20. I ignored my pain and symptoms for years, much to my chagrin. Ended up getting worse and it resulted in a rotator cuff with two tears and having to have bicep tendon detatched, cleaned up and reattached. My advice is to see the ortho.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Lots of baseball and then softball. Long term issues but nothing debilitating waited to many years. Get and MRI now. Better to know if and what damage and repair waiting removes the ability to repair. Wished I would have MRI'd it years ago. No doctor over the years said get MRI do the rehab, wrong to late now.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Ice ice baby BUT, at some point, see a good shoulder doc. Concord Ortho (Fox, Morin) and Granite State Physical Therapy (Murry) are the best of the best.
    Your friends in East Texas.

    ReplyDelete
  23. get it looked at as soon as possible by good ortho dr, got 57 of my 76 yrs like a oak tree, dead bones repaired, some still working while partially dead and some arthritis, Read your blog and a couple others not a blogger but you'll input to life can be eye opener...best of luck

    ReplyDelete
  24. Lot of good advice, the best of which is don't screw around, get it looked at.

    I did somethign to mine, last year. And I think, like Jefferey in Alabama above, sleeping on a wedge pillow + Bone spur did it in. Try the shot, it may work. But if NSAIDS don't work, chances are something's messed up.

    When my range of motion suffered, and I looked in the mirror and noticed my arm atrophying, I went back to the doctor. I had three shots previously, and the last one didn't work. They did an MRI, and as the ortho looked at it he said, "yeah..that's a tear. It won't heal itself".

    So I'm typing now, a week after getting 4 anchors installed, the fist time I've been out of the sling in a week. I'm looking at 6 mos + to get back. Here's the rub - it's cold as shit here. And I can't wear anything not buttondown - so all my fleece pullovers are useless. For a few days, I couldn't even put on a wife beater.

    So get it checked.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Get the surgery. You'll feel great in 6 to 8 months. . .

    ReplyDelete
  26. swimming a couple time a week gets the range of motion back and is low impact and it builds back some of those rarely used muscles that balance the entire muscle group out. Works for me.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Ice, then a thermacare pad, wear it before you go to bed leave it on 8-12 hours. Let your body do the healing. Wash-rinse-repeat, if you don't feel improvement then see a doctor. If they want to stick cortisone in you tell the doc to stick in the head of his dick first.

    Victor

    ReplyDelete
  28. It could be your heart. Be careful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It’s not my heart. I’ve been told many times I don’t have one. 🤣

      Delete
    2. It's the Irish in you. ;)

      Delete
    3. Irish, you are a softy! I have it under explicit authority that you have a heart and is a nice guy...

      Delete
  29. I had right side fixed last February 2 full thickness tears and bicep reattached. Left side MRI shows multiple small tears. Did 6 months of PT. Only lost 40% movement and strength. My best advice never plan on getting 8 hours of sleep again, buy Motrin in bulk and the cold makes it worse

    ReplyDelete
  30. Take a dish towel, soak in water, put in a large ziplock with a few slits cut in it.
    The put this in a large athletic sock and put in microwave for 90 seconds.
    It will come out warm and moist.
    Put this on your shoulder, neck or back..whatever is sore.
    This has worked for me for years of low back pain and shoulder soreness.
    Hope it works for you.
    Be well,
    Gunny
    E-7 Ret.
    78-03

    ReplyDelete
  31. I feel your pain, brother. I've put off having surgery on both of my shoulders for over 25 years. My knees have been the priority, since walking is slightly more important than painful shoulders. I hope some of the aforementioned remedies work for you. Getting old sucks, although I suppose it IS better than the alternative. :-D

    PS: The Founder's stout and Stella Artois worked out nicely last night. I didn't feel a bit of pain in my shoulders by the end of the night. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  32. See the doc to rule out a real injury. Relief with epsom salt baths and ice, sweet ice. Rehab with Indian clubs. I have been "throwing" them for a few years and love them. Great for strength and mobility. Use opposite arm to post pics of hot redheads. Keep us posted.

    Start with the 1lbers.

    https://www.oldtimestrongman.com/products/indian-clubs/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Also NSAID's how could I forget them? Aleve at many times the recommended dose works wonders for immediate relief. Tough on the entire GI system and not for long term use though.

      Delete
  33. To help with shoulder pain:

    Take a hot shower.
    Rub palm-full of Epson salts on shoulder and arm.
    Let stand awhile.
    Shave.

    Wash hair with Kirk's castile soap & Borax.
    Rinse.
    Pat head with dry hand towel.
    Pour apple cider vinegar on scalp.
    Rub in thoroughly.

    Close eyes!
    Rinse well and rinse off Epson salts.
    Exit shower. Dry off.

    Immediately put 1 tablespoon coconut butter in hand and a good squirt of CASTER OIL.
    Mix in palm and rub into shoulder & arm until it soaks in.

    Put on long sleeve thermal undershirt.
    Keep arm and shoulder warm at all times.
    Especially at night.

    The cut-off sleeve of an old wool sweater works wonders.
    So do leg-warmers.
    Just pull it all the way up to the shoulder and fasten with something like a suspender strap.

    The caster oil needs warmth to work.
    Coconut oil helps the caster oil penetrate the skin.
    Kirk's soap is all natural; contains no chemical surfactants.
    Borax is a natural salt & boosts the soap (promotes lather).
    Apple cider vinegar rejuvenates hair and scalp and kills bacteria.

    To help alleviate stress, put a few drops of lavender oil on temple areas (both sides).
    Do isometric exercises to build back shoulder & neck muscle.

    Physical therapy with this holistic approach works if damage is not too severe.
    Ask your ortho if PT is covered. You might be surprised.

    As the body ages, tendons and ligaments become brittle and tear.
    Caster oil increases circulation and aids in the repair.

    Epsom salt is used to treat minor aches and pains, soothes tired muscles and reduces swelling.
    Epsom salt contains magnesium sulfate, a vital mineral.

    Grate fresh ginger and make a strong tea. Add peppermint oil.
    Ginger is a natural anti-inflammatory.
    Sulfur containing foods like garlic, broccoli, cabbage and sauerkraut are healing foods.

    Make "Flu-soup"...
    Sauté fresh garlic in olive oil, add chicken broth, then add nutritional yeast (amino-acid powerhouse).
    It works wonders.

    Quick morning tonic:
    Squeeze 2 lemons, add a bit of water, grate a bit of fresh turmeric, add dash of black pepper, then 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda.
    Watch it fizz.
    Enzymes in fresh lemon & baking soda alkalize the blood.
    Turmeric is an anti-inflammatory.

    Before bed:
    Drink fresh (hot) chamomile tea with locally sourced honey.
    Ahh.

    Go find a Bruce Willis movie like RED or The Whole Nine Yards.
    Get a glass.
    Add slices of frozen cucumber to bottom.
    Add a few ice cubes.
    Top-off with Hendrick's Gin.
    Add fresh-cracked peppercorns.
    Mix with middle finger.
    Enjoy.

    Hope this helps.
    Oh, I no longer lift car batteries any more.
    Not my job (lol).

    Tony
    Gansevoort NY





    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Are you an "Essential Oils" kind of guy too?

      Delete
  34. My family doctor put me on statins (Lipitor, Crestor, etc. About a month later I started waking up with the feeling that someone had been beating me all night in the shoulders. I quit taking them, problem solved.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Had your symptoms happen to me about 4 years ago. My doctor blew it off and handed me some 800 MG Motrin. I shit you not, it took TWO AND A HALF YEARS before I could lift my left arm above my head without intense, excrutiating pain.
    Take my advice and go see a sports injury specialist.

    ReplyDelete
  36. For minor aches & pains, I recommend veterinary liniment. Absorbine for Horses (not Jr.), Vetrolin or better yet Bigeloil. I've used all three, there's others on the market.
    -tallow pot

    ReplyDelete
  37. Had shoulder surgery last summer in the middle of COVID mania for a torn rotator cuff, arthritis damage, and lots of adhesions so I'll say this. Try everything else first. Get it looked at and try a cortisone shot and physical therapy and give it a chance before you try surgery. I had mine under control with cortisone and PT until I got jammed up in a cramped MRI machine while they were looking for what turned out to be a benign tumor behind my sinuses. The shoulder would not recover so I had the surgery in July and stayed in PT till September. It took a long time before I could even sleep in a bed but it is actually a lot better now. Then in December they went in through my nose and pulled the tumor. Then in January me right retina detached and I'm still recovering from that. I also have another pending fix to me right eye muscles that got damaged when I fell due to a seizure in 2016 which is also when I hurt the shoulder and probably the retina. Again - try everything before surgery. In spite of everything I'm doing quite well and getting all this crap fixed. My eye is getting better by the day thanks to the awesome Doctors at UT Southwestern in Dallas. Also I've been able to maintain a sense of humor thanks in part to some funny blogs like this one which also afford me the chance to occasionally vent.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mikey. You’re always welcome here. Good luck with all the recovery ahead of you.

      Delete
  38. About 6 years ago I thought I was going to need shoulder surgery. Went to the ortho. He said he thinks it's frozen shoulder. Gave me a cortisone shot and my shoulder was pain free and full motion the next day.
    Fast forward to about a year ago. Have the same problem, but now on the left shoulder. Go to the same ortho, get another cortisone shot. Did not work, but it did take the edge off. I've spent the last year doing intense stretching on that shoulder to get it loosened up. Still have a very minor pain, but it's about 95% now.
    Hope you get it figured out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Had adhesive encapsulitus (frozen shoulder)on my racquetball arm after about 25 years of playing-did all the standard doctor stuff and none of it worked (x-rays, MRI, shots,anti-inflamatories, hot/cold). Did about 15 sessions with the best PT guy in town. He'd have me do some warm up exercises then lay me out on a low couch and manipulate the shoulder until there was a steady stream of tears rolling down my cheek (yes, it was painful, but nothing is free in life). They can also shorten the procedure by putting you under, grabbing your arm and ripping the shit out of the scar tissue all at once, then sending you home with a bag of pain meds. Kind of like how they do things in a basement in Baghdad, only you don't get to leave. The key for me was getting the best PT guy in town.

      Delete
    2. Oh yeah, the pain. I would stretch mine until I was near passing out.

      Delete
  39. One caveat about cortisone injections - I had a fair number of those for a bad knee, and got early onset of cataracts as a result. Only found out about the cataract connection after mine were well established. On the other had, having a knee that actually works is a good thing.
    Frank

    ReplyDelete
  40. This has nothing to do with shoulder pain, but since your pain was sudden this is worth hearing-especially for you older, Caucasian guys of northern European descent.

    I had been at the cabin up in the mountains working like a dog one summer (cabins are kind of like boats-always in need of repair). After lunch I went back to work (was digging out boulders to increase the parking area) but started with some easy work so my lunch could settle-was sawing off some low flying tree branches. In bed that night my right side hurt like hell-every movement brought pain. I thought it must've been due to reaching up on tippy toe to cut some of the branches and getting some muscle strain. Neither beer nor ibuprofen had fixed the pain. Worked the next day but again had pain throughout the night in bed. Spent most of the time trying to sleep upright in an easy chair. Drug my ass back into town on Saturday and tried to keep quiet about the pain, but the OW could tell something was not right. Went to ER Monday morning and found out I had a blood clot on the right lung.

    Four years previous I learned I had a genetic blood disorder called Factor Five Leiden and to make matters worse both my Factor Five genes (one from each parent) were bad, which increases the risk for bad things happening substantially. Was tested because our daughter had a leg clot during her 2nd pregnancy (she has only one bad gene). Refused to go on Coumadin (dumb mistake-but I'm German/Dutch), thinking "never me". My body works just fine when it needs to start the clotting process, but the bad genes slow down the process for stopping the clotting (sort of like having one of the four brakes on your pickup become defective). For whatever reason I had a clot form-with FVL they usually form in the lower extremity (from the waist down)-and then break loose, blow through my heart (luckily) and then splash onto the right lung like a wet snowball, which is the text book play-by-play of how it usually happens.

    The punch line: the entire episode played out for me just like it has for plenty of others since FVL was discovered in 1994 (which at the time made it a relatively new field of treatment). The problem and symptoms have existed for ages, it's just that an accurate diagnostic test had never existed, and knowledge of what was going on was pretty much a crap shoot. The common response-especially if you are not a hypochondriac-is usually: "I felt pain but never even knew there was a serious problem". For a lot of people the sudden pain is unexplainable and is often written off as something that will just go away after a while. That could work sometimes when we were younger but not so much later in life. At one time it was said that 5-10% of Caucasians of northern European descent may have one or two bad Factor Five genes. Trivia: the 'V' in FVL denotes Roman Numeral V or five. Quite a few, but not all of the many blood factors have Roman Numerals as identifiers.

    Moral of the story: when you have sudden pain and are no longer a kid then do something about it sooner rather than later. Let us know how it all works out. Glad to read all the feedback from others who have been there/done that.

    ReplyDelete
  41. Physical Therapist here.

    How is your diet?

    In some folks, a burst of sugar can inflame the pancreas.
    A unique set of nerves connects the pancreas to a cluster in the right shoulder.

    Sugars take many forms:
    * cane sugar
    * grains
    * legumes
    * alcohol
    * fruit and fruit juices

    Example one:
    A jelly sandwich dumps a major load of sugars for your pancreas to modulate.
    Add some carrot juice and an apple (because somebody said it is healthy...), and your pancreas may need a half-day to stabilize.

    Example two:
    A breakfast of Sugar-Frosted Choco-Bombs, skim milk, a bagel (no butter because somebody said it is healthy...), coffee with sugar, juice.

    Both these are a diabetic doctor's trip to Cancun.

    *****

    Obesity may be a factor.
    A new term is circulating among health-care professionals -- 'diabesity'.

    *****

    A better breakfast includes animal protein, oil(s), vegetables, water.
    For example, my favorite breakfast:
    * simmer bone broth in a skillet, add left-over vegetables with olive or coconut oil, crack three or four eggs to poach.

    The oils temper the absorption of any sugars in the vegetables.

    By-the-by, I aim for twelve servings of vegetables daily.
    We operate a small organic teaching farm near the outskirts of Eugene Oregon... so vegetables are 'in my blood'!

    ReplyDelete
  42. If it is tendonitis, do not, do not do anything with that joint that causes you to feel that pain. It will resolve in time only by resting that joint. Applying any therapy, drugs or topical management may make it feel better, but will likely fool you into using the joint and lengthening the duration of the injury.

    ReplyDelete
  43. Deep tissue massage helped me. Please also look at this ...

    https://www.endocrineweb.com/news/diabetes/covid-long-haulers

    ReplyDelete

Leave us a comment if you like...