Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Question:

An acquaintance recently went for a job interview. The person conducting the interview asked, "are you familiar with The Seven Rules of Reasoning?". He replied that he was not.  After the interview he began to ask other people if they'd ever heard of these seven rules. So, far no one has answered in the affirmative. He has tried Google, etc., but hasn't had any luck. Is anyone reading this is familiar with the said rules, please explain. The hotties are just eye candy so you hounddogs will stop and read the post! LOL




20 comments:

  1. https://www.amazon.com/Moral-Choices-Introduction-Scott-Rae/dp/0310291097

    Dr. Scott Rae presents his 7 step process for approaching ethical dilemmas in his book.

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  2. https://www.umassd.edu/fycm/decision-making/process/

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  3. Moral Choices by Dr. Scott Rae outlines the distinctive elements of Christian ethics while avoiding undue dogmatism. The book also introduces other ethical systems and their key historical proponents, including Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, and Immanuel Kant. After describing a seven-step procedure for tackling ethical dilemmas, author Scott Rae uses case studies to address some of today’s most pressing social issues.

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  4. Thu wot?

    I'm not exactly a philosophy major, but... in my *cough cough* some years on earth I think I'd have heard of them by now.

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    Replies
    1. I was thinking the same thing NITZAKHON, but I'd never heard of such.

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  5. https://www.umassd.edu/fycm/decision-making/process/

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  6. Chapter 4 - the 7 step procedure for reaching a decision in an ethical dilemma
    1. Gather the facts.
    2. Determine the ethical issues.
    3. Determine what virtues / principles have a bearing on this case
    4. List the alternatives.
    5. Compare the alternatives with the virtues / principles which have a bearing on this case.
    6. Consider the consequences.
    7. Make your decision.

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  7. These are seven types of reasoning. I think they might be the ones you speak of. They look applicable.
    https://simplicable.com/new/reasoning.

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  8. I've heard of the 7 types of reasoning.
    Intuition
    Critical thinking
    Deductive
    Inductive
    Abductive
    Backward inductive
    Counterfactual


    And i've heard of the 7 habits of highly effective people.

    It sounds like the interviewer was making crap up.

    Exile1971

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  9. You know, the people who conduct interviews make me laugh. Maybe that ended the interview there. When they ask questions like that, what are they trying to accomplish? It does a disservice to both the prospective employee and the employer. I have heard of companies that pose these smarty pants questions and if you don't know the answer, that is that. Just stupid policy.

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  10. if two comes after one, then six is before seven and five is after four, with who's on third? :-)

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    Replies
    1. simple 27 but the better question would be who is in the batters box

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  11. I took on an interview for an HR position some years ago with an HR type who pissed me off as soon as I walked into the office and signed in at the appointed time at the reception desk. Oh, the HR is on lunch break for another hour. OK. I'll wait for them to return.
    during the interview, I was asked for my goals if employed by that company. answer was, too assure I took the interviewers job and had that person fired for cause and blackballed from the industry and destroyed that person in the eyes of that persons network of friends and acquaintances. asked why I would do that, I answered because I could and it was necessary for the improvement of the species. I received an offer from them the next week which I did not take.

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  12. There are actually 8 Rules of Reasoning.

    The 8th rule you presented here very well: it negates the other 7.

    Walk in. Walk out. Walk on.

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  13. http://www.yashanet.com/studies/revstudy/hillel.htm

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  14. So, let me see here, if this week was next week last week. That means this week is not next week until OOOOF!

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  15. Daddy Approves.

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  16. I would like to think everyone for all of the input. I have passed it along.

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  17. https://simplicable.com/new/reasoning

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