Saturday, November 17, 2018

A very nice find: A short video of the discovery and raising of the German WW2 Unterseeboot 534



I was reading the story about the missing Argentinian submarine that went missing a year ago and saw this video of U-534. Enjoy





9 comments:

  1. @Irish . . .
    I've been following the story of the missing Argentine sub. Their program called for six boats, but because of poor economics, only two boats were completed. Two additional boats were started but never finished - they were cannibalized for parts, and the final two boats were never started.
    If you ever get to the greater Chicago area, check out the U-505, housed at the Museum of Science and Industry. The '505 was captured at sea just before D-Day, 1944, was towed to Bermuda, languished for a few years, and was finally bought by the Museum. It was towed from Portsmouth, through the St. Lawrence Seaway, into Lake Michigan, and parked at the Museum in 1953 or 1954. Been there ever since. In the late 1990's the boat was moved 2,000 feet from an outdoor resting place into its current home which is an environmentally-controlled display hall. And then there's the tale of the old German periscope found in 2003 in a US Navy warehouse in San Diego, which turned out to be one of the scopes from the 505. Once the identity was confirmed, the scope was reunited with the boat in 2003 or 2004. Amazing shit.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by Brad. I have been inside the U-505 and have met the Chief Engineer of the USS Charlatain who was one of the first members of the boarding party inside after she was brought to the surface/captured. I was very fortunate to have got the whole story firsthand.
      Jeffery

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    2. I have been on board U505 at the museum you speak of. I was just a youngster of about 30 years of age and quite a bit slimmer at the time. I just have been claustrophobic too which I didn't realize at the time. I wasn't able to get past the control room. It's cool right in there, good place for midgits....or .the little people as you call them to sit out the war so at least they could make a contribution to the war and not be gassed by hitler.:-[ :-[ .

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    3. @Jeff,
      Hearing from a member of the boarding party . . . that must have been something. Wow.
      By chance, have you read the book "Iron Coffins" ?? Chilling

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    4. I have not read that book, but have read some pertaining to U-boats. "U-Boat Commander" is one of my favorites. Regarding the boarding party, there was actually a B&W film playing at he museum display when the older gentlemen points to the screen and tells his wife "that is me" pointing to a man in a small boat sent to the 505. Here is one video I found of YouTube of the capture.
      https://youtu.be/cIgyF1R1D88

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    5. @Jeff,
      I guess now I have to go back to the museum and visit the '505. Has been a while -- maybe as long as ten years. Some pretty amazing stuff . . . considering the basic design of the German WW2 uboat force goes back to the designs of their WW1 boats. Also check out uboat.net -- all sorts of interesting things there.
      And the missing 'scope ... here: http://articles.latimes.com/2002/sep/13/local/me-nazisub13

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  2. Missing from this story is how the enormous enterprise to raise U-534 overcame international law, which considers national vessels under commission never abandoned. They must remain where they sank, untouched.

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    1. Interesting Anon. I'll have to research that.

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    2. I didn't realize this was international yet..

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